Course Offerings - Spring Term 2018-2019

Beginning and Intermediate Language Courses:

 

German 0101 - Beginning German 1

This is an elementary language course for students who have not previously studied any German. In this course, you will learn important basic communicative skills, e.g. how to greet people, how to talk about yourself, your hobbies and interests, your schedule and housing situation, how to read and respond to a short email from a friend, and more. You will also learn about the culture in the German-speaking countries, e.g. about food, and public transportation. During class, the focus will be on communicative activities that help you practice the new vocabulary and grammatical structures you are learning. Homework will consist of writing, reading, listening, and speaking activities, as well as grammar exercises. You will also work on a project that will give you the chance to show off your newly acquired skills in a creative way. Students will be working towards the A1-level of the Common European Framework of Reference. Students should plan to take GER 0102 during the following semester.

Section 1010  -  MoWeFr  1:00PM-1:50PM                   Instructor:  Ulrike Malandro, M.A.

Section 1020  -  MoWeFr  11:00AM-11:50AM               Instructor:  Dr. Viktoria Harms

German 0102 - Beginning German 2

This course is for students who have successfully completed GER 0101, or who have placed into the course on the basis of the department placement test. In this course, you will continue to learn important basic communicative skills, e.g. how to talk about your work and your health, what to say when you want to buy clothes, how to write a restaurant review, and more. You will also learn about the culture in the German-speaking countries, e.g. about the school system in Germany, and what makes Berlin such an interesting city. During class, the focus will be on communicative activities that help you practice the new vocabulary and grammatical structures you are learning. Homework will consist of writing, reading, listening, and speaking activities, as well as grammar exercises. Just as in GER 101, you will also work on a project that will give you the chance to show off your newly acquired skills in a creative way. Successful students will reach A1-level and begin working towards the A2-level of the Common European Framework of Reference.

Section 1010  -  MoWeFr  11:00AM-11:50AM               Instructor:  Dr. Benjamin Brand

Section 1020  -  MoWeFr  10:00AM-10:50AM              Instructor:  Dr. Benjamin Brand

Section 1030  -  MoWeFr  12:00PM-12:50PM              Instructor:  Dr. Seth Berk

Section 1040  -  MoTh       6:00PM-7:15PM                  Instructor:  Dr. Seth Berk

German 0201 - Intermediate German 1

This course is for students who have successfully completed GER 0002 or GER 0102, or who have placed into the course on the basis of the department placement test. The topics will be more complex than in the beginning German courses, as we will talk for example about advertising in Germany, or clichés and cultural differences. During class, the focus will be on communicative activities that help you practice the new vocabulary and grammatical structures you are learning. Homework will consist of writing, reading, listening, and speaking activities, as well as grammar exercises. As in all the German language courses, you will also work on a project that will give you the chance to show off your newly acquired skills in a creative way. Students will begin to work towards the B1-level of the Common European Framework of Reference.

Section 1010  -  MoWeFr  12:00PM-12:50PM               Instructor:  Dr. Maureen Gallagher

German 0202 - Intermediate German 2

GER 0202 is intended to follow GER 0003. The topics will be more complex than in the beginning German courses, as we will talk for example about the role of the environmental protection in German society and politics, about social values and Europe. During class, the focus will be on communicative activities that help you practice the new vocabulary and grammatical structures you are learning. Homework will consist of writing, reading, listening, and speaking activities, as well as grammar exercises. As in all the German language courses, you will also work on a project that will give you the chance to show off your newly acquired skills in a creative way. Students will be working towards the B1-level of the Common European Framework of Reference.

Section 1010  -  MoWeFr  10:00AM-10:50AM               Instructor:  Dr. Viktoria Harms

German 0204 - Intensive Intermediate German 2

This intensive course, which meets 5 times a week, is for students who want to progress quickly in order to take the upper-level courses, or those who just cannot get enough of German. You must have successfully completed GER 0203, or have placed into the course on the basis of the department placement test. If you have taken GER 0201 in the fall and would like to take this course, please speak to your instructor. The topics will be more complex than in the beginning German courses, as we will talk for example about the role of the environmental protection in German society and politics, about social values and Europe. You will also read a modified version of the German novel Am kürzeren Ende der Sonnenalleeand learn about life in the GDR. During class, the focus will be on communicative activities that help you practice the new vocabulary and grammatical structures you are learning. Homework will consist of writing, reading, listening, and speaking activities, as well as grammar exercises. As in all the German language courses, you will also work on a project that will give you the chance to show off your newly acquired skills in a creative way. Successful students will be able to reach the B1-level of the Common European Framework of Reference.

Section 1010  -  MoTuWeThFr  12:00PM-12:50PM       Instructor:  Ulrike Malandro, M.A.

 

Upper-Level Courses in German:

 

German 1001 - German Writing

Do you want to improve your written German? Explore different styles of writing? If you answered yes, then you should sign up for this course! In this course, we will review the most important grammar concepts; explore the conventions for  writing emails, job letters, expository and descriptive prose, arguments, thank you notes, and more; and practice the art of proofreading and editing texts. All discussions, reading, and writing assignments will be in German. Prerequisites: German 0004, or equivalent course, or test score.

Section 1040  -  MoWeFr  10:00AM-10:50AM               Instructor:  Dr. Anita Lukic

German 1004 - Professional German 2: The German Business (Eco)System

This is an advanced language course that aims to familiarize students with specialized vocabulary, practices and the culture of German-speaking countries with respect to professional areas, specifically the business world.As the second part of Professional German, this course concentrates on the following areas: Industry (locations, branches, importance), Economy (trade within Germany, the EU, and non-EU countries), Environment (role, policy, importance), as well as Alternative and Renewable Energies (in Germany, in the EU, technology, policy & importance). The course focuses on oral and aural proficiency, appropriate written discourse, and reading. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate and compare German, EU and US practices with respect to industry, trade, technology, energy, and the environment. The course integrates the economic geography and business culture of all German-speaking countries in Europe: Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. PREQ: GER 0004, or equivalent placement test score.

Section 1160  -  TuTh  4:00PM-5:15PM                        Instructor:  Dieter Waeltermann

German 1104 - German for Social Scientists 1

This course focuses on the development of West Germany, especially in the years immediately following World War II and the 1950s through the 1960s. The course takes a comparative approach in analyzing how historical experience has shaped both the rebuilding of the political system as well as collective identity. It discusses, for instance, how Germany's first attempt at democracy during the Weimar Republic represents one significant historical point of reference and the economic system the other one. Topics include the role of economic recovery and the narratives about this so-called "Economic Miracle" of the 1950s for the reconstitution of a national identity after Nazism and the Holocaust. A central aspect of exploring this time period is the significance of USAmerican popular culture and lifestyle for shaping (West) Germany's youth. The course concludes with assessing the counter-cultural upheavals of the 1960s referred to as the Student Movement, the Anti-Authoritarian Movement. Materials include excerpts from current history books, written and audio-visual first-hand accounts of the time period, German documentaries and feature films. This course satisfies the following General Education Requirements: Geographic Region, Historical Analysis.

Section 1010  -  TuTh  2:30PM-3:45PM                         Instructor:  Prof. Sabine von Dirke

German 1105 - Literary Analysis

In this overview course we will explore German literature through some of its most important epochs and genres. Beginning with the Classical Period of the 18th century and ending with the postwar period in the 20th century, we will read poetry, drama, and novellas. As we move through these different literature types, we will develop a technical vocabulary and learn different methodological and theoretical approaches that will lend us guidance. Most of the assigned readings will be in German. Occasionally, more complex theoretical readings and articles will be assigned in English. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, two in-class tests, and occasional writing assignments, including a final paper written in German. (Course will be conducted in German.) This course satisfies the following General Education Requirement: Literature.

Section 1160  -  MoWe  3:00PM-4:15                            Instructor:  Dr. Maureen Gallagher

German 1350 - German Drama

Analyze, adapt, and perform the play Andorra. Have you learned anything from your past mistakes? This is what the Swiss playwright Max Frisch wants to know from the citizens of Andorra – fifteen years after the end of WWII. The answer is complicated, but the queston remains as relevant today as it was back then. All readings and discussions will be in German. PREQ: GER 0004, or equivalent, or test score.

Section 1010  -  MoWeFr  2:00PM-2:50PM                   Instructor:  Dr. Anita Lukic

 

Courses in English:

 

German 1500 - Germanic Myths, Legends and Sagas

We remember their gods in the names of days (Wodan's-day, Thor's-day, and Frigga's-day); we celebrate, with an altered purpose, their great festivals at winter solstice and onset of spring; we use such disparate terms from their language as "law," "ransack," and "berserk"; and we name athletic teams after their intrepid pirates the Vikings; but still we know relatively little about the complex culture of ancient northern Europeans. This course will present a cultural survey from about 500 BC to about 1500 AD of this folk. Our sources will be the people's own cultural artificats: archaeological and anthropological findings, written sagas, oral ballads, traditional legends, customs, superstitions, place names, and language expressions. The course's aim is to show how these artifacts reflect the cultural and personal values of the people who created and used them. Topics covered will include social organization, distribution of labor and wealth, the position of women and children in family and society, and the uses of supernatural beliefs to achieve worldly goals. Where appropriate, parallels will be drawn between modern northern European values and their formative myths from the distant past. Prerequisites: none. All readings are in English. This course satisfies the following General Education Requirements: Geographic Region, Literature.

Section 1010 (LEC)  -  MoWe  1:00PM-1:50PM            Instructor:  Prof. Uwe Stender

Section 1025 (REC)  -  Th  11:00AM-11:50AM              Instructor:  Dr. Viktoria Batista

Section 1030 (REC)  -  Th  12:00PM-12:50PM              Instructor:  Dr. Viktoria Batista

German 1502 - Indo-European Folktales

This course introduces students to both a wide selection of Indo-European folktales as well as numerous perspectives from which to understand these folktales. We will examine the aesthetic, social, historical, and psychological values that these tales reflect. In addition, we will discuss significant theoretical and methodological paradigms in the field of folklore studies, including structural, socio-historical, psychoanalytic, and feminist perspectives. Finally, we will analyze the continuing influence of this folk tradition on popular and high culture of our time. Upon completion of this course, the students should be familiar with a wide variety of Indo-European folktales, be able to discuss several approaches to studying them, be able to identify the most important motifs of these tales, be familiar with some of the most influential folklorists, writers, and editors of the tales, and be able to assess the significance of folktales for contemporary western culture. This course satisfies the Foreign Culture requirement of the School of Arts and Sciences. This course satisfies the following General Education Requirements: Geographic Region, Literature.

Section 1015 (LEC)  -  MoWe  2:00PM-2:50PM            Instructor:  Dr. Jaclyn Kurash

Section 1020 (REC)  -  Th  9:00AM-9:50AM                  Instructor:  Alton Post

Section 1022 (REC)  -  Th  10:00AM-10:50AM              Instructor:  Dr. Benjamin Brand

Section 1025 (REC)  -  Fr  1:00PM-1:50PM                   Instructor:  Dr. Benjamin Brand

Section 1027 (REC)  -  Th  12:00PM-12:50PM              Instructor:  Dr. Benjamin Brand

Section 1055 (REC)  -  Fr  9:00AM-9:50AM                   Instructor:  Alton Post

Section 1065 (REC)  -  Fr  12:00PM-12:50PM               Instructor:  Dr. Jaclyn Kurash

Section 1070 (REC)  -  Fr  10:00AM-10:50AM               Instructor:  Dr. Jaclyn Kurash

Section 1080 (REC)  -  Fri  11:00AM-11:50AM               Instructor:  Dr. Jaclyn Kurash

German 1530 - Weimar Culture

The purpose of this course is twofold: to provide an introduction to the weird and wonderful literature, film, and visual art of Germany’s Weimar Republic (1918 and 1933) and to learn to interpret these cultural products as reflections of a Weimar culture of crisis and transition. We will discuss Germany’s interwar period and the transformations resulting from the trauma of WWI, economic instability, rapid modernization, and the development of new technologies. Within this broader context, we will focus on changes brought about by the women’s and gay-rights movements, including the destabilization of gender norms, the emancipation of women from the domestic realm, and the openly gay culture in Berlin. Weimar writers, filmmakers, and artists working in the styles of Expressionism, New Objectivity, and Dadaism responded to these changes. While examining their work, we will discover celebratory images of the New Woman, androgynous figures, and technological advancements of the era, and alternatively, we will investigate sinister visions of deadly robots, femmes fatales, prostitutes, and serial killers, as expressions of cultural anxieties about the dangers of progress. Texts by Franz Kafka, Erich Kästner, and Irmgard Keun, films by Fritz Lang, Robert Wiene, and F.W. Murnau, and artwork by Jeanne Mammen, Christian Schad, Hannah Höch, Georg Grosz, and Otto Dix will be central to our discussions. Taught in English.

Section 1010  MoWe  4:40PM-5:45PM                          Instructor:  Dr. Jaclyn Kurash

German 1542 - Marx and Marxism

Having recently passed the 150th anniversary of the first edition of Capital Volume 1, we recognize that our world has changed a great deal since its publication. Yet, in reviewing many of these changes, it is not overstated to say that the works of Karl Marx have provided and still do provide transformational impulse. Who was this person, Karl Marx? Why is it that in this post-Cold War world his writings continue both to inspire and threaten contemporary readers? How have those inspired by Marx further developed his ideas? These are some of the questions that this course will raise and try to answer in order to introduce students to the complex conceptualization of modern society by Marx and his successors. We will begin with discussions of excerpts from key works by Marx in order to assess in the later part of the semester contemporary attempts at rethinking Marxism. Special emphasis will be given to the recuperation of Marxism since the 1960s through the Frankfurt School as well as the French and Italian tradition of autonomous Marxism. This course satisfies the following General Education Requirements: Philosophy of Thinking, Ethics.

Section 1010 - TuTh  1:00PM-2:15PM                           Instructor:  Prof. Sabine von Dirke

German 1545 - Nazi Culture

This course explores the Third Reich, WWII, the legacy of Human Rights, and the Far Right and Neo-Nazi movements in our contemporary period. It relies on film and other primary source materials from Nazi Germany to help students understand what motivated the perpetrators as well as the general populace. While attending to the specificity of the III Reich, it explores fascism as a global phenomenon and gives students the ability to consider extremist populist movements on a political spectrum. This course satisfies the following General Education Requirements: Diversity, Historical Analysis.

Section 1010 (LEC)  -  MoWe  11:00AM-11:50AM        Instructor:  Prof. Randall Halle

Section1015 (REC)  -  Th  10:00AM-10:50AM               Instructor:  Dr. Jeffrey Heinzl

Section1020 (REC)  -  Th  11:00AM-10:50AM               Instructor:  Dr. Jeffrey Heinzl

Section1025 (REC)  -  Th  4:00PM-4:50PM                   Instructor:  Dr. Seth Berk

Section1030 (REC)  -  Fr  10:00AM-10:50AM                Instructor:  Dr. Seth Berk

Section1035 (REC)  -  Fr  10:00AM-10:50AM                Instructor:  Dr. Seth Berk

German 1550 - Computational Methods in Humanities

This one of the very few courses offered at the University of Pittsburgh that are designed specifically to address the knowledge and skills involved in quantitative and formal reasoning within the context of the interests and needs of students in the humanities. The course meets three days a week for fifty minutes and involves a combination of lecture, discussion, and practical programming exercises. There are no prerequisites; in particular, students are not expected to have any prior computer programming experience and they are not required to know any foreign languages. On the other hand, as is the norm for courses with 1000-level numbers, students should have some experience with college-level study, especially in the humanities; this will assist them in identifying interesting humanities research questions, which they will then explore with the computational skills they will acquire in the course. Humanities students often do not realize (or even imagine) that 1) they are capable of learning to write useful and practical computer programs within the course of a semester even if they have no prior background in programming; 2) the ability to write one’s own programs can be valuable for scholars in the humanities, especially because commercial software often does not address research needs in the humanities; and 3) practical computer programming, no less than reading, writing, and arithmetic, is a useful skill that is within the reach of any educated person regardless of academic specialization. This course will introduce students to the role that computational methods can play in primary research and scholarship in the humanities, using as a framework eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and related technologies. XML has excellent properties for textual modeling, which makes it singularly useful for humanities computing, and it is not an accident that many digital humanities projects today are built around XML and related technologies. The related technologies addressed in the course include a powerful declarative programming language (XSLT), a query language for XML databases (XQuery), a formal model for the navigation of XML documents (XPath) used by XSLT and XQuery, several metalanguages for the formal modeling of documents (W3C Schema, Relax NG, DTD, TEI), a constraint modeling language (ISO Schematron), a graphic description language (SVG), and others. This University Honors Course satisfies the following General Education Requirements: Quantative  and Formal Reasoning.

Section 1060  -  MoWeFr  10:00AM-10:50AM                Instructor:  Prof. David Birnbaum

 

Other Courses:

 

German 1901 - Independent Study

Please contact a departmental advisor. Special permission is required to take this course.

Section 1010  -  To be arranged.                                     Instructor:  Prof. John Lyon

German 1902 - Directed Study

Please contact a departmental advisor. Special permission is required to take this course.

Section 1020  -  To be arranged.                                    Instructor:  Prof. Randall Halle

German 1905 - German Internship 1

Please contact a departmental advisor. Special permission is required to take this course.

Section 1010  -  To be arranged.                                    Instructor:  Dr. Anita Lukic

German 1906 - German Internship 2

Please contact a departmental advisor. Special permission is required to take this course.

Section 1010  -  To be arranged.                                    Instructor:  Dr. Anita Lukic

German 1990 - Senior Thesis

Please contact a departmental advisor. Special permission is required to take this course.

Section 1010  -  To be arranged.                               Instructors:  Prof. Randall Halle & Prof. Sabine von Dirke