Skip to Navigation
University of Pittsburgh

News Archive, 2003-2005

September 2005

ENDOWED CHAIR ANNOUNCEMENT
UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH
DEPARTMENT OF GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES
ASSISTANT, ASSOCIATE, OR FULL PROFESSOR IN GERMAN AND FILM STUDIES POSSIBILITY OF CHAIRED APPOINTMENT

Last year the Department of Germanic Languages and Literature at the University of Pittsburgh announced the establishment of an endowed chair to honor a distinguished colleague whose dedicated service to the university and department extended from 1957 until 1988. Pending budgetary approval, our search for an outstanding scholar and teacher in the field of German Film and Cultural Studies is continuing, with the rank open. Applicants of exceptional merit and promise will be eligible to be appointed as the first holder of the Klaus W. Jonas Chair beginning in September, 2006. In the case of an appointment at the rank of assistant professor, the question of the endowed chair will be addressed at the time of the tenure review. Scholars and teachers who would be appointed as associate or full professors with tenure and who have begun to establish distinguished records of publication and teaching in German film would be eligible to hold the endowed chair with the initial appointment. The salary will be commensurate with the position. In addition to a promising and/or distinguished record of publication and teaching in German film, candidates must have demonstrated strengths within such related fields as German literature and culture or German intellectual history from the 18th century to the present. Crucial in the selection process will be the ability to sustain the kinds of significant links that our department has established over the years with interdisciplinary programs at the university (including Film Studies, Cultural Studies, West European Studies, and/or Jewish Studies) as well as with cognate departments (for example, French and Italian, History of Art and Architecture, Philosophy). In addition, the promise for high achievement in undergraduate and graduate teaching, as well as in supervising Honor’s, M.A., and Ph.D. research, and a willingness to participate in the intellectual life of the German Department are necessary. Review of applications will begin November 15, 2005 and will continue until the position is filled. Candidates who are interested in meeting representatives of the department at the 2005 MLA convention in Washington, D.C. should submit cover letters, CV’s, and dossiers to Professor Clark Muenzer, Department of Germanic Languages and Literature, 1409 CL, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 by November 15, 2005. The University of Pittsburgh is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and members of minority groups under-represented in academia are especially encouraged to apply.

April 2005

ELIZABETH BARANGER EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING AWARD FOR 2005

German Department Graduate Student Wins Teaching Award Ph.D. candidate Zsuzsa Horvath was named as one of just six Arts & Sciences recipients of the Elizabeth Baranger Excellence in Teaching Award for 2005. This year was the first year the award has been offered. The student teachers who were honored were selected from nominations by the University of Pittsburgh community, primarily undergraduate students, and by a committee made up of graduate students and faculty.

November 2004

ENDOWED CHAIR ANNOUNCEMENT
THE KLAUS JONAS CHAIR IN GERMAN AND FILM STUDIES

The Department of Germanic Languages and Literature at the University of Pittsburgh is pleased to announce the establishment of a newly endowed chair to honor a distinguished colleague whose dedicated service to the university and department extended from 1957 until 1988. We are seeking a scholar and teacher of international reputation at the full professorial rank in the field of German Film and Cultural Studies to become the first holder of the Klaus W. Jonas Chair beginning in September, 2005, pending budgetary approval. The salary will be commensurate with the position. In addition to a distinguished record of publication and teaching in German film, candidates must have demonstrated strengths within such related fields as German literature and culture or German intellectual history from the 18th century to the present. Crucial in the selection process will be the ability to sustain the kinds of significant links that our department has established over the years with interdisciplinary programs at the university (including Film Studies, Cultural Studies, West European Studies, and/or Jewish Studies) as well as with cognate departments (for example, French and Italian, History of Art and Architecture, Philosophy). In addition, demonstrated successes in undergraduate and graduate teaching, as well as in supervising Honor’s, M.A., and Ph.D. research, and a willingness to participate in the intellectual life of the German Department are necessary. The search for the endowed chair will continue until the position is filled, but candidates who are interested in meeting representatives of the department at the 2004 MLA convention should submit cover letters and CV’s to Professor Clark Muenzer, Department of Germanic Languages and Literature, 1409 CL, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 by December 1st, 2004. The University of Pittsburgh is an Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and members of minority groups under-represented in academia are especially encouraged to apply.

October 2004

The Pittsburgh Chapter of the International Association of Business Communicators (IABC) awarded the Pitt German Department website an Award of Honor in this year's Golden Triangle Awards. More information about the IABC and about the awards is available at http://www.iabcpittsburgh.com/home.jsp

June 2004

The German Department, after receiving national recognition by the Association of Departments of Foreign Languages, was written up in the University of Pittsburgh's University Times. (Vol. 36, #20, June 9, 2004). Read the article here.

May 2004

Professor Sabine Hake, who built an international reputation in German film and cultural studies of the Weimar period during her tenure in the department, will be joining the faculty at the University of Texas, Austin, in the Fall. We wish her well as she embarks on this new phase in her career and warmly thank her for the many years of collegiality that we have enjoyed together.

April 2004

The Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) has awarded the Pitt German Department website a bronze medal in this year's Circle of Excellence awards. The Circle of Excellence is a nationwide competition held by CASE, an international association of professionals who advance educational institutions. The complete list of winners will be posted on CASE's Web site http://www.case.org/ in June.

March 2004

Professor Beverly Harris-Schenz, Recipient of the Chancellor's Distinguished Teaching Award, is featured on the University of Pittsburgh's College of Arts and Sciences "Classic Clips" series. To see a video of Professor Harris-Schenz' teaching, click on the following link: http://cas.pitt.edu/classicclips.htm

January 2004

The New Year brought with it a new website for the German Department. The department thanks the Office of University Marketing and Communications for their efforts in designing the site as well as the numerous stamp designers who provided generous copyright permission to allow us to use their stamps.

Fall 2003

The Fall 2003 Bulletin of the ADFL features an article about our department as a model of good practice in the profession. Based on the results of a survey of 2,631 units, we were selected from a subset of some hundred Foreign Language departments nationwide to provide a narrative about what has made its undergraduate programs strong. Professor Sabine von Dirke, who chaired the department at the time of the ADFL-project, compiled the report, which covered the year 1995-2000. The entire faculty is delighted that our efforts of many years to establish an innovative and vigorous program for undergraduates during a period of declining resources (and enrollments) has achieved this kind of national recognition.